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#154528 by sanshouheil
Mon Sep 26, 2011 10:53 pm
It's better to do whatever you do.
And not concern ourselves with how others approach music.

#154538 by Slacker G
Tue Sep 27, 2011 1:17 am
I always over play. Just a bad habit. I have to edit a lot out when I record, but I'm really trying to keep it harnessed.

One of the best studio musicians I have ever heard says: Don't over play. Always leave them wanting to hear more. He practices what he preaches, and has such good taste. He has recorded tons of hits and I could always pick him out because of his amazing grasp of what is needed to better a song.

I am turning into a minimalist. Sometimes recording with just one instrument on one track and vocal on the track. Sometimes just two guitars, and other times with bass and drums.
The only serious consideration a musician should make is what does the song require? In the end it all depends on the song and your interpretation of the song.

Anyone who can answer your question properly for you is lying. :)

#154547 by fisherman bob
Tue Sep 27, 2011 4:33 am
It is simply better to go all out but save something good for later...
#154553 by PaperDog
Tue Sep 27, 2011 6:37 am
Dajuggernut wrote:When it comes to music is it better to keep things simple or go all out!


I recommend simple... because simple can go all out (in a simple way).
Like if you shred with 32nd notes, just be sure you stick with only the 32nd notes that are simple (as opposed to the complicated ones... )
If you sing , keep as close to the melody as you can...since that would be the simplest approach to singing the song. You might see why its also important to pick only the simple songs for a show, ... I have found that the complicated songs only resulted in a complicated show...and that is way more than any audience could handle. Next ting you know, the audience starts getting complicated on you, and then they start demanding complicated songs... At that point, would you even dare to "go all out"? See whut I mean? :D

#154555 by Jahva
Tue Sep 27, 2011 11:50 am
Simple or all out...
Each song has it's own identity.
Music is like cooking to me. Sometimes you've got to spice it up to really get the flavor across.
And other times it's just peanut butter and Jelly.
Sometimes you may want to try and create a WOW in it through interactions and harmonies, then other times you may want just minimal sounds so the focus stays on one thing (like the vocal melody or maybe guitar line).

I don't prefer it to be one way or the other all the time. So I don't believe one way is always the answer. Most of the "great" artists seem to have a variety from stripped down to big orchestrated pieces. The music or song can be as subtle as a light rain or a raging thunderstorm just depends on what you're trying to create. I think the key is "don't over-produce". Know when to stop.

"Watch ya back" seems right to me. I liked the keyboard fills you used.

#154556 by jimmydanger
Tue Sep 27, 2011 12:30 pm
There's no doubt that if you want the maximum number of people to like your music you need to keep it "accessible". Most people want a good beat, a grooving feel and a hummable melody. Other people ignore this and end up appealing to mostly other musicians. If this means KISS then KISS!

#154579 by MikeTalbot
Tue Sep 27, 2011 6:09 pm
I can be very annoying when learning a new song (as some folks found out recently). I work in reverse of most intelligent folks. While putting together a bass or guitar part i throw everything at it including the kitchen sink.

Then I edit down, keeping only the best of it. Sometimes very minimal - but often not. I did play a lot of three piece in my time which makes me a busier bass man than most.

My advice is do it the way that suits you best and find folks that can deal with that. when I have the music has been worth the work.

Talbot

#154609 by JazzAnarchy
Tue Sep 27, 2011 9:36 pm
When Louis Armstrong matured more in his trumpet, he found the power a single note can have over a dozen in his improvs. But, then again, Coltrane started playing more as he got older, so I can't really see you going wrong either way. I prefer the minimalist stance myself. And blue hats.

#158966 by crunchysoundbite
Thu Dec 01, 2011 4:45 pm
Stevie Ray had a song Lenny. Being the analitical I am,I wondered,Why does this song sound so loving to "Lenny"? I discovered it was his wife. How's that for interpretation?! :shock:

#158967 by crunchysoundbite
Thu Dec 01, 2011 4:50 pm
32nd notes are great in perspective, but can easily be overdone and overused. They are expressive. and brighten dark corners of a melody. Think of Lenny Cravits. Contrast that against ZZ Top.

#158970 by Lynard Dylan
Thu Dec 01, 2011 5:19 pm
Every comment here is good, each songs its own.

#159002 by crunchysoundbite
Fri Dec 02, 2011 9:55 am
JazzAnarchy wrote:When Louis Armstrong matured more in his trumpet, he found the power a single note can have over a dozen in his improvs. But, then again, Coltrane started playing more as he got older, so I can't really see you going wrong either way. I prefer the minimalist stance myself. And blue hats.
I have a Louis Armstrong album.I've never heard it, But you'remaking me want o dig it out and play it.

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