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#239957 by wahead7207
Sat Feb 28, 2015 2:08 pm
just wanting a little advice. i've been playing for quite a few years and now i think i'm ready to start recording. the question i have is what would be the best way to go on starting home recording. it will be on a very tight budget but i'm hoping i can get more out of it than it just being a hobbie. thanks in advance for any help.
#239958 by The Adapters
Sat Feb 28, 2015 2:21 pm
There are many different brands of software for home recording. If you're like me and don't plan to spend any time reading directions, then you might like the Sony Acid version.

If you're interested in possibly going deeper into a career of recording, then take the time to learn ProTools and you can work in almost any studio in the world when you've learned it.
#239960 by wahead7207
Sat Feb 28, 2015 2:38 pm
yod wrote:There are many different brands of software for home recording. If you're like me and don't plan to spend any time reading directions, then you might like the Sony Acid version.

If you're interested in possibly going deeper into a career of recording, then take the time to learn ProTools and you can work in almost any studio in the world when you've learned it.


i've been told about a program called "avid". do you know anything about it?
#239989 by The Adapters
Sun Mar 01, 2015 1:04 am
Avid? That's a video editing software. Maybe they are doing sound recording too?
#239992 by MikeTalbot
Sun Mar 01, 2015 1:23 am
I tried a number of DAWs - Audacity, ProTools, and Reaper and didn't like - didn't understand them.

Then I got Audiobox by Presonnus which is pretty nice - two channels and came with Studio One recording software.

So far Studio One is the best I've used and it is even starting to make sense to me.

Mine was a rather cheap solution < 200.00 for it all including upgrading Studio one to Professional Version.

Good Luck

Talbot
#240038 by GuitarMikeB
Mon Mar 02, 2015 1:37 pm
Check out all the sticky posts in the forums at homerecording.com - lots of good info there.

'Avid' is the manufacturer of M-Audio interfaces, I think most come with a limited edition of Cubase.

There are lots of htings to think about before buying equipment:
1) What's the ultimate use of the recordings - just for fun, for playing along with, for posting on the internet, for commercial release?
2) What is your technical competence? There's a fairly steep learning curve for most DAWs (recording software).
3) Like any 'hobby', be prepared ot keep investing money into it. What's your starting budget? Have any equipment now? (mics, headphones, etc)
#241420 by thetuberoots
Fri Apr 03, 2015 11:08 pm
It really depends on what kind of computer you are using.

If it's an Apple, then you already have Garage Band which will fit the bill nicely until you're ready to move up to pro level (Logic Pro X or Pro Tools).

If you're using a PC, then it's a bit trickier. You can get Pro Tools or many other apps (some free) to get the job done.

Ultimately, I would suggest using an Apple. Better operating system and hardware. Far more reliable.
#241424 by MikeTalbot
Sat Apr 04, 2015 1:08 am
Mr. Roots

i believe you are correct about using Apple if you can. When I got Studio One i asked a pretty knowledgeable sales tech for software that came closest to Garage Band for the PC world. I'm ok with it but if I were starting fresh and had money - I'd definitely go Apple.

If PC is all you have - as in my case - than Studio One has been there.

Talbot
#241457 by GuitarMikeB
Sun Apr 05, 2015 12:03 am
It USED to be that Macs were the only real choice for music or video production work - no longer. Today's software and processor speeds have negated the advantages.
ProTools, with its constant 'new versions' that one must pay (through the nose) for, is no longer the only player in town. IF you want to share PROJECTs with a pro studio, then yes, you're stuck with it, but otherwise (as most people do these days who collaborate) you send WAV stem files (raw tracks, or semi-processed) which can be inserted into any other DAW. PT also has the disadvantage of not being able to use VST plugins (without using a special gimcrack).
#285540 by MooG8tor
Thu Apr 19, 2018 4:06 pm
I understand exactly what you're up against! I hadn't been very active in recording live music for a long time, and man did things change. The last recorder I had was a Fostex 4 track tape machine! I've been using the Reaper DAW, I figured that since it's a free trial (without time constraints) there's little risk. I bought a Sonic Port VX interface and run everything through a really old (but decently powerful) laptop. I'd suggest finding a YouTube channel that is styled to your liking, someone who speaks in terms you can understand. That will shorten the learning curve quite a bit. Try keeping things as simple as possible too. Since you're on a tight budget there's no reason to buy a bunch of crap you might have get rid of if you decide recording isn't far you. Good luck! 8)

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